• It’s time to change the dialogue around chronic illness

    I see you. You’re struggling, you put on a brave face, you are as active as your body will let you be. You don’t say much about your condition on platforms like social media, because everyone knows just enough about medicine to be dangerous (or at the very least, naively condescending.) “Have you tried___” “My aunt has ____, and she is fine.” “I bet if you just ____” “I’ve heard some people just have to eat XYZ.” “I can’t imagine, I could never give up ____” “You should look into ____, that sounds scary.” “Buck up, don’t dwell on the negative.” “Do you even want to be well?” “Psychosomatic.” Sound…

  • While We Wait

    We have our first guest blogger today, and it’s none other than my amazing mom, Tomya Peters. She is inspires me; from public speaker, children’s and women’s curriculum writer, to long time Christian blogger. She is now a two-time published-author, and so much more! She raised and home schooled 5 children. With over 30 years in ministry, alongside my dad, she knows resilience, dedication, partnership, and long-suffering. I’m honored to be her daughter, and excited to share her words with you. Tab Moura, Lovely Resilience Project —– While We Wait We had spent five-and-a-half years on the mission field in Australia, and it was time to come home. We moved…

  • Messy Goodness

    Those who know me know that I lead a life with many hats. Depending on the day, I might be wearing my chronic illness hat, or my special needs Mom hat, or my preacher hat, etc… I like hats, apparently. At the time of writing this, it is Good Friday. For those of us in the Christian community, this is the day we remember Jesus’ death on the cross. You can find this story in a few books, but I like the writings of Luke best. The story of Jesus’ death, burial and resurrection begins in Luke 22. This is the play by play, friends… but I challenge you to…

  • Check your soil

    The question is not “am I smart, am I beautiful, am I useful, am I successful?” The question is “am I planted in the right soil?” Are you where you’re supposed to be? To the untrained eye, these plants were both placed in good soil… but what you cannot see is the foundation slab a foot beneath the plant on the right… it’s roots could only go so far. Having trouble? Check your soil.

  • Mountains, not the hills

    This week has been a firm reminder that at any given moment, there are many mountains out there waiting for me… not just the one I am on. Some would call this a “buzz kill” of sorts, but i disagree. As I sit here, massaging my leg that spontaneously fell asleep, while my low blood pressure limits simple activities (like standing for conversations), I have plans to visit the East Coast to see museums and historical monuments. I have plans to hike the Redwood Forest and Grand Canyon, places I haven’t been since I was a kid. Those are mountains I can only get to if I am fully dedicated…

  • Brief and Real

    I have tried to write this update for weeks now. Holy crap, guys. Where do I begin? It’s been a tsunami, avalanche, hurricane of life since my last update… and God has been good. So good. Since my last update we have gone from unemployed, to my husband working 60+hrs a week. We have gone through a rollercoaster of diagnostics with my husband’s hearing, from tumor, to hospital admission, to neurological hearing loss, to “Hey, guys, we were way wrong. It’s only a FUNGUS growing in his ear.” Then there is the heart monitor I wore for over two weeks (would have been 4, except there is an issue with…

  • Lean in and Be Motivated

    Thanks to science, we know that the brain does not finish developing until around 25 years old. With this we know that most of our core beliefs are formulated before 25, with few major changes thereafter without something drastic influencing those beliefs. What we don’t talk about very often is how those core beliefs are driven by feelings that we believe at our core. Many of you are familiar with the movie Inside Out. This movie is such a powerful display of how this unfolds, passively demonstrating how Riley’s main driver was joy, but her parents’ drivers were sadness and anger. In real life it isn’t that simple, we know…